cool facts about Azerbaijan

Azerbaijan is a land of many mysteries, but also of plenty of facts. See 10 cool facts about Azerbaijan here!

The Land of Fire

Azerbaijan is often called the Land of Fire and there are several reasons why. The word ‘Azerbaijan’ literally means ‘protector of fire’; the country is abundant in oil and natural gas; it was a centre of fire worshipping; and fire has always been one of the symbols of our capital, Baku, which today is reflected in the amazing Flame Towers.

Multicultural Azerbaijan

Once situated along the Great Silk Road, many peoples have passed through these lands, helping to shape the nation’s unique traditions of tolerance and hospitality. Today, Azerbaijan is a secular country where Sunni and Shia Muslims, Christians, Jews and many other small nations have been living in peace for centuries. 

Women’s suffrage

1918-1920 was fascinating time in Azerbaijan, with the first republic (the Azerbaijan Democratic Republic) introducing a number of innovations. One of them was the decision to grant women suffrage in 1918, making Azerbaijan the first country to do so in the Muslim East, and even beating many Western countries to it.

Mud volcano capital

Azerbaijan is home to an amazing collection of about 350 mud volcanoes, many of which are found in a relatively small area around Baku and nearby areas of the Caspian Sea. It’s not surprising then that Azerbaijan is sometimes called ‘the mud volcano capital of the world’ – the ground here can indeed be messy, bubbling and explosive!

Miniature Books’ Museum

The world’s first private Museum of Miniature Books is located in Baku’s Old City, a historical and architectural reserve and a World Heritage Site. This extraordinary museum is also home to the world’s largest collection of miniature books, according to the Guinness Book of Records. On display here are over 5,500 of them. 

Oil achievements

Azerbaijan has a truly historic oil industry. In 1901 Baku’s oilfields were supplying over half the world’s oil, and during the Second World War accounted for approximately 75 per cent of oil produced in the Soviet Union. Baku oil therefore supplied the eastern front with the vast majority of the fuel that powered Soviet tanks and aircraft to victory.

Caspian Sea coastline

Azerbaijan has some 500 km of coastline along the Caspian Sea, the world’s largest inland body of water and a remnant of the vast Parathethys Sea that stretched from the Alps to the Aral Sea. The capital, Baku, is the largest city on the Caspian and boasts beaches, boulevards and bars replete with calming sea views and breezes.

The Heydar Aliyev Centre

The Heydar Aliyev Centre, an architectural masterpiece designed by the late Zaha Hadid won the London Design Museum’s Design of the Year award in 2014. Its visionary, undulating form has become a symbol of modern Baku. Not a single straight line was used in its design. Inside you’ll also find world-class museums and exhibitions.

The Karabakh horse

The beautiful Karabakh horse, native to Azerbaijan and a symbol of the country, is prized for its speed, stamina and beautiful chestnut colour. Traditionally bred in the now-occupied Karabakh region, numbers have declined but breeding continues in western parts of the country. In 1956 a Karabakh horse was even gifted to British Queen Elizabeth II.

Carpet weaving

Azerbaijan is an ancient centre of carpet weaving home to seven regional schools, each distinguished by their own unique combination of patterns, colours and motifs. What’s more Baku boasts the state-of-the-art Carpet Museum, which is shaped like a rolled up rug and houses the world’s largest collection of Azerbaijani carpets. 

The Land of Fire
Multicultural Azerbaijan
Women’s suffrage
Mud volcano capital
Miniature Books’ Museum
Oil achievements
Caspian Sea coastline
The Heydar Aliyev Centre
The Karabakh horse
Carpet weaving

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